The Maine
An artful dialogue about the wonders of the state.

A Postcard Home

handmade by Margaret Rizzio

Night Hikes

photograph by Joseph Sortwell

Breakwater Evening

photography by Jim Dugan

New Midcoast Eats

food by Ada’s Kitchen and The Lincolnville General Store

Casting Bread and Cookee

from Maine Lingo: Boiled Owls, Billdads, & Wazzats by John Gould

CASTING BREAD: This refers to making yeast bread at seas or in the woods, as distinguished from making hot biscuits, muffins, johnnycake, etc. Of several explanations of the term’s origin, the most likely one comes from the way Cook worked. He would mix his wet ingredients in a bowl, and then cast them into the open flour barrel, atop the flour. With his hands, he would work in as much flour as the mixture would take up, and then he would cast the dough on his board for kneading.

COOKEE: An assistant to a lumber-camp cook. He serves at table, washes dishes, and aspires to becoming a cook. In the days of lumbering on snow, the cooked was the cock-crow; he awakened the men by hammering on his “come-and-get-it” — a swaddled or length of metal used as a dinner gong. He was expected to have some merry jingle to put the crew in good pre-dawn, sub-zero humor, and would call out as he banged, ” Wake up and hear the pretty birdies sing!”

Toasty Buns

display by Jo Ellen Designs

 

The Way It Goes

original song by The Oshima Brothers
recorded live in Whitefield 

Magalloway

painting by Jessica Ives

Fall fishing at its finest.

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207 Paintings post everyish Tuesday around 5:30am EST on both The Maine and jessicaleeives.com. Save thirty percent on a 4×4 inch oil on panel painting by making your purchase within the first week of its posting. Instead of $300 pay just $207, a number which just happens to be the Maine state area code.

Tuesday 207 Paintings are exclusive to The Maine. They depict the land, the light and the people that make this state a state of wonder. Jessica is editor of The Maine and writes occasionally as The Outsider.

Maine Farmland Trust