The Maine
An artful dialogue about the wonders of the state.

Tag: natural history

Rainbows, September 4, 2012

photographs and text by Jennifer Steen Booher Editor’s note: This week a year ago… Our family had gathered to celebrate my father-in-law’s birthday when we were distracted by the drama unfolding in the sky. First a fragment of rainbow began to spring upward from Ironbound Island. Then a second rainbow shot off at a funny […]

The Sound Of Spring

video, photograph, and text by Polly Saltonstall Hear the sound here Some people think frost heaves are the first sign of spring in Maine. I think spring starts much sooner, when the maple sap runs. There’s nothing quite like the first little rush of cold, sparkly liquid out of a freshly installed spile, and the […]

Frost

photographs and text by Jennifer Steen Booher There was some very peculiar frost on my car’s spare tire this morning. It looked like tiny feathers, or petals, standing up at a 45º angle. Kind of like ruffled fish scales? It must have a name. Everything has a name, if you ask the right person. The […]

Advent, Day 20: Seeking Sunlight, We Went Looking For Caves

Dear readers, Join The Maine for an adventure a day, each day of this advent season — big or small, by land or sea, with friends or solo, in image or word, exuberant or contemplative, real or conceptual. We live in a state of wonder, its wide open spaces anticipating our hope and joy. Karen Zimmerman is the […]

Cobra Plant: Belle of the Bog

text by Kyrill Schabert phototgraphs by Tony Oppersdorff

Red-bellied Woodpecker

text and haiku by Kristen Lindquist A poet friend writes, “Haiku is the art of meaning what you don’t say.” My flaw as a haiku poet is I’m too narrative-minded. My impulse as a writer is to tell stories, make the connections between what I’m experiencing and what I’m feeling so the reader can be […]

Just Squidding Around

photographs and text by Karen Zimmerman Sydney’s dad shows the soft skin and colors of a squid  Pale and luminous, the squid drift in a group towards our lures, and then scatter. Their movement is smooth, so different from fish that swim with tail flicks and fins. They slide. Propelled by sucking water and then […]

The Belted Kingfisher

text by Tony Oppersdorff photographs as noted Female eastern belted kingfisher, wet from a dive. (photo by David White)  Sexual Dimorphism: Vive la Différence  Sexual dimorphism is a tidy phrase that means males and females of a species can be distinguished by their size, color, shape, or structure. Such phenotypic differences are familiar: male African […]

Maine Farmland Trust