Waiting On Bridges

text and photographs by Jonathan Ives
originally published by Happier Outside

bridge

Wiscasset is known up and down the coast of Maine as the place to avoid during peak summertime traffic. All drivers along Route One are held up by pedestrians crossing the street, aimlessly shopping, and waiting in line for a lobster roll from Red’s Eats. Locals and tourists alike must sit and wait their turn, roasting in their vehicles. Last Friday afternoon I drove past six miles of cars inching toward the Wiscasset bridge on their way north.

The next day my wife and I went to Damariscotta Mills to cool off after a long day in the sun. There was another traffic jam here, as well. This time a long line of children waited to jump off the bridge and splash down into the lake. From the parking area down the road you could feel the energy of the children with their screams of joy and excitement. Because the lake was high from so much rain the current pulled each plunged body quickly under the bridge where, swimming like crazy, they struggled back to shore, waiting again to make the next ecstatic splash.

A bridge connects two sides over an obstacle or depression. Locals and tourists will use these bridges all summer and be connected by the full spectrum of human emotion. Over the bridge or under? What are you waiting for?

bridge

bridge